Tag : homecoming

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Our Compass is the Word of God: James Jackson

By: Noelle Beans

Reverend James Jackson is this year’s recipient of the Distinguished Wesley Seminary Alumni Award.

Rev. Jackson is not a stranger to authoritative positions. Throughout his ministerial career, he held many positions of authority and performed with great esteem and with great integrity.

The positions Jackson has held include the following:

  • Director of the Far-Eastside Action Coalition – a task-oriented community group for crime prevention and mentoring, and other projects.
  • Chief Administrative Officer of Valley Kingdom International – a group which seeks to advance the kingdom through intercepting the different systems of society.
  • Member of the Police Merit Board – governing body for the Metropolitan Police Department

Jackson was the first pastor in the history of Indianapolis to ever be asked to serve on this board.

Now, Jackson is the lead pastor of Fervent Prayer Church and the president of the affiliated Academy.

He founded the church 24 years ago and the school 22 years ago.

Somewhere along this journey of ministry, Jackson became frustrated.

Encouragement from Bishop Tom Benjamin to apply and enroll at Wesley Seminary came at the right time.

The first two years of seminary were difficult for Jackson because he had been out of school for a long time.

As he acclimated, the transformation in his life began. Rev. Jackson describes his time at IWU as a lift: “restorative, inspirational and informational – a second wind.”

He graduated in 2016 with his master’s degree.

There are now over 180 children enrolled at the Fervent Care Christian Academy from kindergarten to 12-years-old.

Jackson is a commissioner for the Indiana Civil Rights Commission. He was appointed by Governor Holcomb to make decisions on civil rights cases.

In his daily work, Jackson’s faith is his standard. He functions on a mantra of not who is right, but what is right. When seeking guidance on decisions his compass is the word of God.

Developing a relationship with God over all else is of utmost importance to Rev. Jackson. Apparent by his respected appointments over the years, Rev. Jackson chooses to live this out every day.

Watch the video from the Homecoming Celebration honoring Rev. James Jackson! https://youtu.be/UKuXqbJaGQI?t=494

Written by Noelle Beans, a writer for the IWU Alumni Center. Noelle is a sophomore Nursing and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College from Greenville, Illinois.

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Living by Faith Outside the Comfort Zone: Joel Herzog

By: Kendra Housel

At the age of 39, Joel Herzog found himself going back to school, surrounded by others who were about a decade younger than he was.

He originally came to Indiana Wesleyan University to complete his associate’s degree, and then he went on and to get his bachelor’s degree in management in 2010.

His time at IWU was quite unique. Herzog, returning to higher education and balancing that with his family life, found himself at one point stuck with the problem of needing to do homework, but already being committed to taking his daughter to a concert.

He jokes that he was the only person at the Jonas Brothers Concert reading the Bible.

Herzog chose to attend IWU both for its community and the proximity to his home in West Chester.

Though he was considerably older than his fellow students, which was difficult at times, he enjoyed his time and thrived in a learning environment which emphasized personal attention between professors and students.

Today, Herzog is the Chief of Police at the West Chester police station. It is a larger agency than most, where they will soon have 90 officers on staff.

He works often in the behind-the-scenes duties as Chief, so his days either look very routine, (planning meetings, looking at requests, setting goals, etc.) or they are incredibly difficult (discerning the next appropriate move in a hostage situation).

This, Herzog said, is why his faith is so essential, and why he is so thankful for his time at IWU.

Before coming to IWU, Herzog was raised Catholic, but had not gone to church faithfully for many years.

Through his professors showing him how everything ties back to God, Herzog began attending a nondenominational church constantly and recognized the importance of following Jesus faithfully.

His faith now informs everything he does, both in his personal life and in his job as Chief. He finds that it is important to pray for and with his officers and members of the community.

He has also taken hold of the unique opportunity he found in the West Chester department. When he began, two officers were ordained ministers, and the number has increased to four.

These chaplains are always available to the officers to help them process their spiritual well-being on the job, which in some places can be taboo. However, Herzog says spiritual well-being is just as important as physical well-being.

With a faith that he says has given him a greater vision and more compassion, Herzog has prioritized community engagement with his unit. He wants the community to know his men by their first names and as people, not only as officers.

Herzog stresses how important it is to get out of your comfort zone and to be around people who are not exactly like you. For his men, this not only opens their eyes to different people’s stories and life styles, but it also helps to continue to show communities that police officers are just normal people.

In his pursuit of community connection, Herzog likes to take his wife and visit a new church on some Sundays.

The first time he did this was a very special occasion and it left a lasting impact.

In July 2016, at the height of tension between African American communities and police officers, five officers were shot in Dallas, Texas.

Herzog did the only thing he could think to do: he donned his uniform and took his wife to a predominantly black church that Sunday morning. What happened there was a work of God: amazing love and embracing between the parties that he struggled to describe in a way that would fully honor the memory.

Herzog looks back at that experience as a powerful time, where a bond was built with members of that church family that last to today, because of the great compassion and understanding they shared in such a tumultuous time.

When asked what additional words of wisdom he had for current IWU students, Herzog shared the words he shares with his officers: “If something is important to you – sports, education, marriage, parenting – don’t train until you can get it right … train until you can’t get it wrong. Stick with it; life doesn’t always give you a second shot. Take what you got, work for what you got and fight for what you got.”

Watch the video from the Homecoming Celebration honoring Col. Joel Herzog! https://youtu.be/UKuXqbJaGQI?t=325

Written by Kendra Housel, writer for the IWU Alumni Center. Kendra is a junior Education and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. She is also a member of the University Chorale. Kendra is passionate about serving Christ through writing, singing and caring for others.

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Encouraging Others through Victory: SaLisa Flagg

By: Dezaray Barr

SaLisa (Lisa) Flagg is this year’s recipient of the IWU Distinguished National and Global Alumni Award.

“I’m very excited and very honored to receive this award,” Flagg said.

She graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University in 2010 with her bachelor’s degree in nursing and in 2014 with her master’s degree in management.

She now works as a registered nurse at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. She utilizes her knowledge to access, plan, intervene, evaluate and document patient care.

“I like being part of the children’s healing process … to let them know that God is a healer and to try to direct them to Christ,” she said.

Flagg also trains and mentors new staff at the hospital, and she formulates nursing diagnoses for training staff on actual and potential health problems.

In addition to being the spokesperson for Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, she also started a women’s ministry mentorship project at Rose Chapel Church where her husband, Pastor Mark Flagg, serves in ministry.

The Women’s Ministry Mentorship Program aims to guide ladies ages 18 and over to triumph in all areas of their lives. They meet once a month with women from both the church and from the community.

“We let them know that they’re not alone,” Flagg said. “Whatever situation they’re fighting or coming up against, they’ll triumph over it through God.”

Most recently, Flagg has created a workshop, I’m Under Construction, where Christian women of various backgrounds and views gather together for discussion and spiritual growth.

Flagg’s motto is, “The odds may be stacked against you, the past may seem like it’s controlling your present and future and you may think that you can’t win; however, God and his glorious plan are enough to give you the victory.”

Congratulations, Lisa! It is an honor to call you an IWU alum!

Watch the Homecoming Celebration video honoring SaLisa Flagg! https://youtu.be/UKuXqbJaGQI?t=206

 

Written by Dezaray Barr, PR Specialist for the IWU Alumni Office. Dezaray is a senior Strategic Communication, Journalism and Honors Humanities triple major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. Visit Dez’s website at www.dezaraybarr.weebly.com.

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The Importance of Community : Joe Winger

By: Kendra Housel

Joe Winger and his family at his graduation.

Joe Winger learned several life-changing lessons during his college years at Indiana Wesleyan University that cannot be discovered in textbooks or class lectures.

Winger, who graduated in 2010 with a B.S. degree in psychology, knew as a high school student in Colorado that he wanted to attend a Christ-centered university. After a Google search and a campus visit, he knew IWU was where he belonged.

The years he spent at IWU confirmed his choice, but in a way that he neither expected nor desired. The summer before Winger returned to campus for his senior year, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a cancer that primarily affects the lymph nodes.

Winger remained in Colorado to begin chemotherapy and radiation treatments during the first semester of his senior year, but he was able to complete his degree thanks to independent study.

“Dr. Tim Steenbergh and other faculty members become advocates for me,” he said. “The opportunity to work on my studies helped me to stay focused and to have a positive attitude during my treatments.” Steenbergh, a Professor of Psychology, has taught at IWU since 2003.

 Winger returned to campus for his final semester in the spring of 2010, but he struggled with taking a full load of classes and missed the Colorado community that had surrounded him.

Winger would quickly learn how important community and meaning were in successfully battling cancer.

“The IWU community made my transition back to campus as smooth as possible,” he said. “So many people at IWU did everything possible to support me in person, just as they had done when I was in Colorado.”

Through his diagnosis and treatment, Winger said God taught him that life has meaning regardless of your circumstances. He learned the importance of staying connected to people and to Christ at all times.

Joe Winger and his wife, Bekah.

“My eyes were opened to the suffering of cancer patients,” Winger said.

During his treatments, Winger read Man’s Search for Meaning, a book by Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl. “The book focuses on the importance of maintaining meaning in the midst of suffering,” Winger said.

Fast forward to 2017 when Winger finished his Ph.D. He recently completed his first year as a postdoctoral associate at Duke University Medical Center.

Through a fellowship from the American Cancer Society, Winger’s work focuses on Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy (MCP) with an emphasis on helping patients with advanced cancer

and pain.

The study focuses on pain coping skills, relaxation techniques and identifying ways to stay engaged in a meaningful life. He is testing MCP with 50 cancer patients at Duke.

“God’s faithfulness put me in the field where I belong,” he said.

What advice does Winger have for today’s IWU students?

“Value being in a Christian community,” he said. “When I was at IWU, it never fully sunk in for me just how unique a time it was in terms of community. Especially for students who will go into secular environments, they will never get the same sense of community that seeks to glorify Christ in their work that they have now on campus.”

 

Written by Kendra Housel, writer for the IWU Alumni Center. Kendra is a junior Education and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. She is also a member of the University Chorale. Kendra is passionate about serving Christ through writing, singing and caring for others.

Keith O’Conner Murphy

By: Kendra Housel

Keith O’Conner Murphy graduated from Marion College in 1968 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. As a child, Murphy grew up in poverty, without luxuries like indoor plumbing. He remembers his mother bringing water inside and heating it over a hot coal stove so that he was able to take a bath.

Murphy, in recalling his childhood, said that “that kind of background tends to either crush you or motivate you. I am one of the lucky few who it motivated to excel. Only as I matured in later years did I realize that I wasn’t poor in the important things. I had ethical, moral, hardworking parents which some kids did not.”

Coming from a very musically gifted family, he was actively involved in singing in the church choir, and he took to instruments early on. Before coming to Marion College (now IWU), Murphy graduated from Oak Hill High School in 1962. Without any money or special contacts, he and his band got a recording contract shortly after they graduated.

When his first record came out early in 1963, so did the Vietnam draft. Murphy called the draft board to inquire about the likelihood of his own chances of being drafted and when he was given the potential timeline of three months, he hung up the phone and called Marion College. As a college student (and first member of his family to be one), he was given a deferment and avoided the draft.

As a student, Murphy was a commuter from Sweetser, who also worked consistent day jobs and actively traveled with his band on the weekends. Most of his time was spent focused on his musical career, though he did recall having to study especially hard for some of his Bible courses. He often likes to joke that the only subject he ever cheated in was Bible, but in reality he was very thankful to have a good friend whose girlfriend grew up in a Biblically saturated environment, and would help the both of them study. Murphy was always very motivated to do well in school to maintain his deferment, so that he could stay in the United States and continue to grow as a musician and student.

In looking back at his time at Marion College, Murphy has especially fond memories of two professors in particular: Dr. Marjorie Elder and Miss. Emerson. Dr. Elder was a gifted professor, but what Murphy valued the most in her was that “she did not criticize [him] for not attending church regularly, or for [having] long hair.” She was very understanding and empathetic towards her students. Miss Emerson was also among his favorite professors. She taught a class where everyone had to memorize a page from a large book of Shakespearean texts. When it came time for all the students to recite their page from memory, the class soon realized that she had the entire, two inch thick book memorized herself, because she was able to correct their reciting without so much as glancing at the book.

Murphy remembers Marion College as a very wholesome and caring environment. With the study of Bible as an emphasis and the chapels (that at the time were twice a week), campus was a unique mixture of kids who had very intense backgrounds studying the bible and students who did not grow up in the faith. In the tumultuous time of the ‘60s, Marion College was what Murphy calls “a stabilizing environment, that never deviated from keeping their priorities straight regarding their important mission… it was a sort of refuge for students.”

In the midst of the riots and turmoil, including Cincinnati, where the iconic rhythm and blues record company King was located, “Keith Murphy and The Daze”  were signed, becoming one of the rare Rock and Roll white artists on King. Around the same time the giant Polydor label of England became interested and also signed them for international exposure. Keith could hardly believe he was on the label who has featured John Lennon, Abba, Bee Gees, and Jimi Hendrix, among many others.

Seven years after graduating from Marion College, Murphy went on to receive one of the first Master’s in Business Administration from Indiana University in Ft Wayne, Indiana. He married his wife Brenda (Rock) Murphy two years into his studies at Marion, though he met her while performing as the hired entertainment at her fifteenth birthday party.

With his masters, he went on to a successful career in business marketing. His career took off initially when he helped to create the formulation and marketing plan for Starburst and Skittles candy. After that success, Mars asked him to relocate his family to New Jersey so he could work at their headquarters, creating new products. He retired from there in 2003. From his experience in candy marketing, he also began his own consulting company called Lollipop Research, and he is the “self appointed Top Pop.”

When asked what advice he would give to current students, Murphy had some wonderful banks of wisdom to share. He began by stressing the need to understand people, in order to love them well. He believes that if you come to know the reasoning behind why someone thinks or acts differently than you do, you will be more inclined to help them and care about them. You have to be willing to look beneath the surface. Along with this he also emphasized the importance of kindness.

Murphy says one of the most telling things that immediately reveals someone’s character is how they treat people who would be unable to do anything for them. As an active voting member of the Recording Academy, which is responsible for awarding the Grammy’s, he has been in a room with many important people, where someone will stop talking to him and his wife mid-sentence to go talk to a more notable celebrity.

One of Murphy’s record’s was requested by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame, which includes people like Elvis, Johnny Cash, Buddy Holly, Rick Nelson and many others. His record is in the permanent collection of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Murphy in closing, wanted students to know that “you are going to one of the best universities there is and will have a firm ethical and moral foundation” but within that he stressed also the great importance of listening to people we disagree with, with compassion and understanding.

Indiana Wesleyan University is a place of great opportunity to grow, in compassion and in profession, and Murphy hopes students will remember that they have a “great start” at IWU and that they are very blessed. Murphy said, “Follow your dreams and conscious, and realize it is not a straight path getting to where you wish to end.” Murphy is a great example of someone who lives out this advice; he is truly someone who has taken life as it has come, and enjoyed the ride.

 

 

Written by Kendra Housel, a writer for the Alumni Center. Kendra is a sophomore Education and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. She is also a member of the University Chorale. She is passionate about serving Christ through writing, singing, and caring for others.

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Alumni Art Exhibit: 1920 Gallery

By: Emily Neideck

Alumni ExhibitThe 1920 Gallery, located in the Indiana Wesleyan’s Barnes Student Center, hosted an Alumni Exhibit Friday October 6 from 8:00PM-9:30PM. The gallery held pieces created by various alumni from different career paths and backgrounds.

Sophie Stewart, The 1920 Gallery Fellow, wrote in her Curatorial Note, “Working from a variety of media and conceptual backgrounds, these artists are linked by their playful curiosity in the materials each uses and subject matter they depict.” The show hosted artists with many different IWU Art degrees, varying from Printmaking to Illustration to Art Therapy.

The Alumni Exhibit is a great resource. Stewart stated, “I have found the alumni show to be very encouraging. Especially for those, like me, who have went through the IWU Art program. Being able to come into this space and see what artists with the same background as me are doing is really encouraging.” This show exemplified the various paths an art student can take after college, showing art students what their options are upon graduating.

Stewart believes that the The 1920 Gallery gives its viewers, particularly students, a vision of great art, which encourages a higher standard of art-making. She said, “These pieces are from great artists, and I think learning from them is important.” Stewart hopes that alumni, students and visitors were able to interact with each other, growing in their artistic pursuits.

Below is a list of featured artists in the 2017 Alumni Exhibit:

Emily Fussner, Printmaking

Cherilyn Kurtz, Photography

Maggie Hubbard, Illustration

Madison Mosher, Graphic Design

Marina Goodwin, Illustration

Carolina Forman, Art Therapy

Jake Sneath, Photography (minors- Business Admin. & Youth Ministry)

Alec Hoogland, Ceramics

Andrew Luttrull, Painting & Illustration

Beaver, Painting & Printmaking (minor- Illustration)

 

 

Written by Emily Neideck, writer for the Alumni Center and a junior Writing major at IWU. She is active on the cross country and track teams. She is passionate about using her writing skills to share the good news of Christ with others and writes often on her personal blog at www.emilylehner.wordpress.com.

 

Homecoming Reunions

By: Dezaray Barr

Today, October 6, 2017, we have the opportunity to celebrate the Marion College/ Indiana Wesleyan University classes of 1952,1957, 1962, and 1967.

We began at 11:30 with a Prelude by IWU student, Jonah Hartsburg, on the piano. We were welcomed by 1967 graduate, John Earnest. Rev. Jim Blackburn, who graduated in 1957, provided the invocation, and IWU ROTC students provided the Presentation of Colors.

After pledging the flag and eating a lovely lunch of chicken salad and fruit, Earnest provided the introduction to Paul Mills.

Mills shared stories about his own life, his time as a coach at IWU and the time period when IWU began intercollegiate sports.

Interviews took place with 1952 graduate Rev. Bob Zuhl, 1957 graduate Rev. James Blackburn, 1962 graduate David Thompson, and 1967 graduate Charles Mealy. Linda )Dryer) Castro, a graduate of 1962, provided a memorial.

After a recognition of our veterans and a musical selection with the school song, John Earnest provided closing comments. Rick Carder, Director of Alumni and Church Engagement, provided some special announcements as the luncheon came to a close.

Once the event was over, class pictures were taken, and campus tours were offered to alumni.

 

 

Written by Dezaray Barr, PR Specialist for the Alumni Office. Dezaray is a junior Strategic Communication and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. At IWU, Dezaray runs both the JWHC Blog and her own blog. Visit Dez’s website at www.dezaraybarr.weebly.com.

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Homecoming 2017 Collection

By: Dezaray Barr

It’s officially homecoming! Be sure to check out all of our homecoming 2017 stories!

 

 

Phill Tague is the lead pastor at The Ransom Church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He and his wife, Stephani, planted the church in 2009, and the church has flourished since.

Each Fall, Indiana Wesleyan University awards one outstanding individual with the Distinguished Wesley Seminary Alumni Award. This award is granted to an alumnus or alumna of the Seminary who has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church, or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ.

This year, Phill Tague of The Ransom Church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is the recipient of this award. Tague and his wife, Stephani, planted The Ransom Church in 2009, and since then, the church has grown abundantly.

Each year, Indiana Wesleyan University awards a Distinguished College of Arts and Sciences Alumni Award. This award is granted to an alumnus or alumna of the College who has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church, or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ. This year’s recipient is Phil Talbert.

Talbert is the CEO of Talbert Educational Consulting, LLC.

Every year, Indiana Wesleyan University awards an individual the Distinguished DeVoe School of Business Alumni Award. This award is granted to an alumnus or alumna of the School who has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ.  This year, that award was given to Brian Harlow. Harlow graduated in 1998 with a Master’s in Management and received an honor doctorate degree from IWU in 2015 at the December Commencement.

Every year, Indiana Wesleyan University gives the Distinguished College of Adult and Professional Studies Alumni Award to an alumnus or alumna of the College who has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church, or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ. This year, Chris Daughtry receives this honor.

Daughtry is the Superintendent at Elwood Community School Corporation located in the heart of Indiana.

Each year, Indiana Wesleyan University awards an outstanding individual with a Distinguished School of Nursing Alumni Award. This award would be granted to an alumnus or alumna of the School who has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church, or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ. This year, Brandon Lee was the recipient. Lee received his Master Degree in Nursing from the Indiana Wesleyan University’s online program in 2006 and is currently using his passion for nursing to help many.

Each Fall, Indiana Wesleyan University awards an outstanding IWU graduate with the Distinguished Young Alumni Award. This award is granted to an alumnus or alumna who graduated from the College of Arts and Sciences within the past 10 years and has exhibited excellence in serving his or her profession, community, church, or alma mater in the spirit of Jesus Christ. This year, two distinguished alumni won this award – Aaron and Jathniel Shepherd.

Garrett Howell is the Founder of Awaken Ministries. He graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in Christian Ministries and in 2016 with a graduate degree in Practical Theology.

Indiana Wesleyan University’s Homecoming schedule this year includes the Awaken Night of Worship on Thursday, October 5th.  This event will be a worship service that gathers alumni and current students together to seek a fresh movement of God’s Spirit in our lives and in our community. Worship band Alanna Story will be leading worship. and Garrett Howell will be preaching.  Doors open at 9 pm, and the service begins at 9:30 pm.  We would love to see you there!

A new scholarship has been established at Indiana Wesleyan University for students who are a part of the Division of Pre-licensure Nursing. The Sloan-Harrison Scholarship will be available beginning in this upcoming 2017-2018 school year. This unique, endowed scholarship was set up by Indiana Wesleyan’s School of Nursing to honor Professor Brenda Sloan and Dr. Pamela Harrison, past educators who have both greatly impacted their students.

 

 

Written by Dezaray Barr, PR Specialist for the Alumni Office. Dezaray is a junior Strategic Communication and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. At IWU, Dezaray runs both the JWHC Blog and her own blog. Visit Dez’s website at www.dezaraybarr.weebly.com.

 

 

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Pastor of the Week: Phil Tague

By: Emily Neideck

Phill Tague is the lead pastor at The Ransom Church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He and his wife, Stephani, planted the church in 2009, and the church has flourished since.

Tague attended Wesley Seminary’s online program for his Master in Ministry. His group was one of the first cohorts to go through the online program, and although his time on campus was limited, he stated, “The program allowed me to not just feel like I received my degree, but that I actually graduated from Indiana Wesleyan.”

The Ransom Church began in a movie theater with only a few people. Tague said, “Since then, we have watched this church grow into only something that only God can get the credit for.” The church now has around 2000 people, two campuses and ministries in nursing homes, as well as a local jail.

Tague stated, “The words we most hear people saying as they enter our church are ‘authentic, relevant, real.’” The Ransom Church focuses application of The Gospel to everyday life, whether in sermon, small group or service. “We are trying to show them how Jesus is part of everyday life. It isn’t in a bulletin on a random Sunday. It is a lifestyle.”

Tague’s call to ministry came the summer before college when he was attending a youth camp. He said, “I did not want to study ministry. I went into the program kicking and screaming. I was playing all the stereotypes in my head.” He spent the majority of his freshman year studying ministry while talking himself out of his faith. All he had seen from Christianity was hypocrisy.

One day, the Holy Spirit softened Tague’s heart. He realized that his answer for hypocrisy shouldn’t be hypocrisy. Tague corrected his fault and began to pursue Christ with his whole heart and mind. “I haven’t looked back since,” said Tague.

Wesley Seminary played a large role in Tague’s journey. He said, “My time laid a foundation for me and gave me the desire to not just be the best pastor, but to also be the best leader that I could be.” Seminary blurred the lines between leadership and ministry for him. Tague stated, “If there is a season when you’re not putting out fires, then you’re not moving. As long as you are chasing what God has for you, you’re going to face difficulties, but you’ll grow, too.”

Tague will speak in Chapel at Indiana Wesleyan on October 4th.

Check out his interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSWQqIuvhJQ.

 

Written by Emily Neideck, writer for the Alumni Center and a junior Writing major at IWU. She is active on the cross country and track teams. She is passionate about using her writing skills to share the good news of Christ with others and writes often on her personal blog at www.emilylehner.wordpress.com.

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Pastor of the Week: Garrett Howell at Awaken Ministries

By: Dezaray Barr

Garrett Howell

Garrett Howell

Garrett Howell is the Founder of Awaken Ministries. He graduated from Indiana Wesleyan University in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in Christian Ministries and in 2016 with a graduate degree in Practical Theology.

“Being an IWU student taught me the importance of seeking God’s presence in my everyday life,” Howell said. “I vividly remember spending hours in my hall chapel as a freshman, praying and seeking God for a fresh movement of His Spirit in my life.  I was surrounded by students and professors who encouraged this pursuit of the Lord, and they added wisdom and insight into my walk with the Lord.”

One of Howell’s favorite professors was Dr. Chris Bounds. “He taught our Theology 1 course and our Theology 2 courses. These classes were powerful and pushed us as students to seek the work of the Holy Spirit in our own lives,” Howell shared. “I remember having tears in my eyes during many class periods as we studied about the work of God in our lives, because I was so needy and hungry for the reality of God’s transforming work in my own life. These courses taught us the reality of God’s work in our lives and that we can and should expect and seek that work today.  Bounds was a pastor to us all, and still is a pastor to me.” Bounds also currently serves on the board of directors for Awaken.

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Awaken Interns

When Awaken began at Indiana Wesleyan, 10 students were selected to be part of the first discipleship group on campus. “These 10 became a close-knit, deeply passionate team that often resembled a spiritual family: they cared for one another and urged one another on toward Christ,” Howell said. “I will never forget a retreat we took as a team one Spring semester. We went to one of the student’s homes for a weekend of fun. We played Frisbee and soccer, ate great food and laughed a lot.  But most of all, we spent time praying over one another and speaking into each other’s lives.  The authenticity and vulnerability of that community was the most powerful thing I had ever felt in my life.  I knew, at that moment, that this was the right thing for me to be focusing on in life.  It was an undeniable reminder that my life should be spent seeing young believers wake up in their faith and become fully sold out to the Gospel.”

Awaken_shot 3[5657]Howell has seen many incredible moments at the hands of God through Awaken. “I remember a night when our weekly Awaken service was about to begin at Indiana Wesleyan University. Just before the service, our student interns walked through the student center to invite additional students to join the event.  During this walk, one of our interns encountered an IWU student who was less than enthusiastic about joining the service; in fact, this student was very much opposed to joining our worship event.  For reasons we still don’t know, this student decided to take the interns’ advice and attend Awaken anyway.  As the service began, the presence of God was overwhelmingly present in an undeniable way.  People began to come forward to the altar and receive prayer, in spite of the fact that no altar call had been made.  The student who didn’t want to come was watching this, clearly surprised at what was going on.  As the service continued, this student began to feel a sense of conviction, and the Spirit moving in his own life. Crying hard, he walked forward and knelt down to the ground, where one of his friends came and prayed with him. Needless to say, God was moving powerfully that evening!” Howell explained.

Howell encourages IWU students to be strong in their faith now, “Don’t wait,” he said. “The way you live life now is creating your lifestyle for the future. You are becoming the husband, wife, father, mother, businessman, pastor, coworker and Christ-follower that you’ll be the rest of your life by how you’re living today.”

Indiana Wesleyan University’s Homecoming schedule this year includes the Awaken Night of Worship on Thursday, October 5th.  This event will be a worship service that gathers alumni and current students together to seek a fresh movement of God’s Spirit in our lives and in our community. Worship band Alanna Story will be leading worship. and Garrett Howell will be preaching.  Doors open at 9 pm, and the service begins at 9:30 pm.  We would love to see you there!

 

Written by Dezaray Barr, PR Specialist for the Alumni Office. Dezaray is a junior Strategic Communication and Honors Humanities double major at Indiana Wesleyan University in the John Wesley Honors College. At IWU, Dezaray runs both the JWHC Blog and her own blog. Visit Dez’s website at www.dezaraybarr.weebly.com.